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View of Harvey, Irma, & Maria from 22,000 miles above the Earth. #GOES16.

View of Harvey, Irma, & Maria from 22,000 miles above the Earth. #GOES16 ...

#Florence 5 p.m. EDT update from NOAA's National Hurricane Center —> Florence now producing tropical-storm-force wind gusts inSouth Carolina. Life-threatening storm surges to continue tonight. Catastrophic freshwater flooding expected over portions of North and South Carolina. >> Please see hurricanes.gov/#Florence for the latest watches and warnings. (or click our profile link). >> For a one-stop page with links to multiple resources, including a live Twitter feed, visit @NWS's site, www.weather.gov/wrn/florence >> Be sure to follow @NHC_Atlantic and @NWS on Twitter. [Photo: @NOAASatellites GOES-East image, 4 p.m. EDT, Sept. 14, 2018.] #Science #nature #space #satellites #tropicalcyclone #hurricanes #noaa @NWS @NOAASatellites #GOES16 #GOESEast.

#Florence 5 p.m. EDT update from NOAA's National Hurricane Center —> Florence now producing tropical-storm-force wind gusts inSouth Carolina. Life-threatening storm surges to continue tonight. Catastrophic freshwater flooding expected over portions of North and South Carolina. >> Please see hurricanes.gov/#Florence for the latest watches and warnings. (or click our profile link). >> For a one-stop page with links to multiple resources, including a live Twitter feed, visit @NWS 's site, www.weather.gov/wrn/florence >> Be sure to follow @NHC_Atlantic and @NWS on Twitter. [Photo: @NOAASatellites GOES-East image, 4 p.m. EDT, Sept. 14, 2018.] #Science #nature #space #satellites #tropicalcyclone #hurricanes #noaa @NWS @NOAASatellites #GOES16 #GOESEast ...

NEW footage of #Eclipse2017: Follow the #shadow of the #moon as it moves west to east across the Northern Hemisphere in this geo-color animation from NOAA's #GOES16 satellite!

Find more animations and imagery from @NOAASatellites at https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/2017Eclipse

#science #satellites #space #totalsolareclipse #eclipse #sun #moonshadow #NOAA.

NEW footage of #Eclipse2017 : Follow the #shadow of the #moon as it moves west to east across the Northern Hemisphere in this geo-color animation from NOAA's #GOES16 satellite! Find more animations and imagery from @NOAASatellites at https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/2017Eclipse #science #satellites #space #totalsolareclipse #eclipse #sun #moonshadow #NOAA ...

#FLORENCE UPDATE 9/14/18: The center of the eye of Hurricane Florence (Cat. 1) finally made landfall this morning near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina.

NOAA Doppler weather radar data and surface observations indicate that the center of the eye of Hurricane Florence made landfall along the coast of North Carolina at 7:15 a.m. EDT...1115 UTC...near 34.2N 77.8W ...which is near Wrightsville Beach. Maximum sustained winds were estimated to be 90 mph. 
REMINDER: This is a dangerous hurricane: Please stay safe and well informed. >> Please see hurricanes.gov/#Florence for the latest watches and warnings. (or click our profile link). >> For a one-stop page with links to multiple resources, including a live Twitter feed, visit @NWS's site, www.weather.gov/wrn/florence >> Be sure to follow @NHC_Atlantic and @NWS on Twitter. [Photo: @NOAASatellites GOES-East (GOES-16) image captured 7:45 EDT, Sept. 14, 2018.] #Science #nature #space #satellites #tropicalcyclone #hurricanes #noaa @NWS @NOAASatellites #GOES16 #GOESEast.

#FLORENCE UPDATE 9/14/18: The center of the eye of Hurricane Florence (Cat. 1) finally made landfall this morning near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. NOAA Doppler weather radar data and surface observations indicate that the center of the eye of Hurricane Florence made landfall along the coast of North Carolina at 7:15 a.m. EDT...1115 UTC...near 34.2N 77.8W ...which is near Wrightsville Beach. Maximum sustained winds were estimated to be 90 mph. REMINDER: This is a dangerous hurricane: Please stay safe and well informed. >> Please see hurricanes.gov/#Florence for the latest watches and warnings. (or click our profile link). >> For a one-stop page with links to multiple resources, including a live Twitter feed, visit @NWS 's site, www.weather.gov/wrn/florence >> Be sure to follow @NHC_Atlantic and @NWS on Twitter. [Photo: @NOAASatellites GOES-East (GOES-16) image captured 7:45 EDT, Sept. 14, 2018.] #Science #nature #space #satellites #tropicalcyclone #hurricanes #noaa @NWS @NOAASatellites #GOES16 #GOESEast ...

The outer bands of Hurricane Florence are officially pushing onshore. This is still a powerful tropical cyclone, packing max sustained winds of 110 mph. Florence is posing a catastrophic flood threat to The Carolinas. Storm surge up to 13 ft. will be possible in some locations. Remember, that means the water rises 13 ft. above sea level, and then gets pushed inland by powerful winds. Isolated pockets of 30-40 inches of rain will also be possible across parts of The Carolinas. The slow nature of this beast is what’s so daunting..

The outer bands of Hurricane Florence are officially pushing onshore. This is still a powerful tropical cyclone, packing max sustained winds of 110 mph. Florence is posing a catastrophic flood threat to The Carolinas. Storm surge up to 13 ft. will be possible in some locations. Remember, that means the water rises 13 ft. above sea level, and then gets pushed inland by powerful winds. Isolated pockets of 30-40 inches of rain will also be possible across parts of The Carolinas. The slow nature of this beast is what’s so daunting. ...

Hurricane Florence is bearing down on The Carolinas tonight, packing wind speeds up to 115 mph. Due to the slow nature of this hurricane, portions of North Carolina and South Carolina are expected to be inundated by 30-40 inches of rain (in addition to powerful winds and intense storm surge)..

Hurricane Florence is bearing down on The Carolinas tonight, packing wind speeds up to 115 mph. Due to the slow nature of this hurricane, portions of North Carolina and South Carolina are expected to be inundated by 30-40 inches of rain (in addition to powerful winds and intense storm surge). ...

GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Hurricane Irma approaching Anguilla at about 7:00 am (eastern) today, September 6, 2017.

According to the latest information from NOAA's National Hurricane Center (issued at 8:00 am eastern), Irma was located about 15 miles west-southwest of Anguilla and moving toward the west-northwest near 16 miles per hour. The extremely dangerous core of Irma will move over portions of the northern Virgin Islands today, pass near or just north of Puerto Rico this afternoon or tonight, and pass near or just north of the coast of the Dominican Republic Thursday (9/7). Irma's maximum sustained winds remain near 185 mph with higher gusts, making it a category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.  Some fluctuations in intensity are likely during the next day or two, but Irma is forecast to remain a powerful category 4 or 5 hurricane during the next couple of days.

Created by our partners at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, the experimental geocolor imagery enhancement shown here displays geostationary satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. This image, captured as daylight moves into the area, offers a blend of both, with nighttime features on the left side of the image and daytime on the right. In nighttime imagery (seen on the left side of this image), liquid water clouds appear in shades of blue, ice clouds are grayish-white, water looks black, and land appears gray. (The city lights are a static background created with VIIRS Day/Night Band imagery. It does not show any existing power outages.) In daytime imagery (shown on the right side of the image), land and shallow-water features appear as they do in true-color imagery. Please note: GOES-16 data are currently experimental and under-going testing and hence should not be used operationally.

For the latest information on Hurricane Irma, including storm-related hazards likely to affect land, visit the National Hurricane Center's website at www.nhc.noaa.gov. #NOAA #NOAASatellites #GOES16 #Irma.

GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Hurricane Irma approaching Anguilla at about 7:00 am (eastern) today, September 6, 2017. According to the latest information from NOAA's National Hurricane Center (issued at 8:00 am eastern), Irma was located about 15 miles west-southwest of Anguilla and moving toward the west-northwest near 16 miles per hour. The extremely dangerous core of Irma will move over portions of the northern Virgin Islands today, pass near or just north of Puerto Rico this afternoon or tonight, and pass near or just north of the coast of the Dominican Republic Thursday (9/7). Irma's maximum sustained winds remain near 185 mph with higher gusts, making it a category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Some fluctuations in intensity are likely during the next day or two, but Irma is forecast to remain a powerful category 4 or 5 hurricane during the next couple of days. Created by our partners at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, the experimental geocolor imagery enhancement shown here displays geostationary satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. This image, captured as daylight moves into the area, offers a blend of both, with nighttime features on the left side of the image and daytime on the right. In nighttime imagery (seen on the left side of this image), liquid water clouds appear in shades of blue, ice clouds are grayish-white, water looks black, and land appears gray. (The city lights are a static background created with VIIRS Day/Night Band imagery. It does not show any existing power outages.) In daytime imagery (shown on the right side of the image), land and shallow-water features appear as they do in true-color imagery. Please note: GOES-16 data are currently experimental and under-going testing and hence should not be used operationally. For the latest information on Hurricane Irma, including storm-related hazards likely to affect land, visit the National Hurricane Center's website at www.nhc.noaa.gov. #NOAA #NOAASatellites #GOES16 #Irma ...

Here comes the suns: 
These #satellite images of the sun were captured at the same time on January 29, 2017, by #GOES16's Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI), a telescope that monitors the sun in ultraviolet wavelengths. As it does so, SUVI can compile full-disk solar images around the clock that scientists can use to enhance their forecasts of space weather.

The SUVI  offers six wavelength channels that allow for the observation of a range of solar phenomena. Learn more and download images from @NOAASatellites at http://bit.ly/2lTkX08.

#nature #science #satellites #space #sun #solar #spaceweather.

Here comes the suns: These #satellite images of the sun were captured at the same time on January 29, 2017, by #GOES16 's Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI), a telescope that monitors the sun in ultraviolet wavelengths. As it does so, SUVI can compile full-disk solar images around the clock that scientists can use to enhance their forecasts of space weather. The SUVI offers six wavelength channels that allow for the observation of a range of solar phenomena. Learn more and download images from @NOAASatellites at http://bit.ly/2lTkX08. #nature #science #satellites #space #sun #solar #spaceweather ...